Dandie Dinmont Terriers


Dandie Dinmont Terriers

Ratings by owners.
| Breed Reviews By Breed | Review a Breed
Dandie Dinmont Terrier Home Page



Average rating.


Breed Notes:

This little terrier was bred in the early 1700s from rough terrier hunters on the border between England and Scotlnd for the purpose of hunting otter and badger. The author, Sir Walter Scott, made the breed famous when he described them in his book Guy Mannering , published in 1814. The popularity of the book led to the breed being called after the name of one of the characters, Dandie Dinmont, whom Scott described as having six of the little terriers. The American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1886.
The Dandie is intelligent, fond of children and an excellent guard dog. He makes a wonderful housepet. Regular coat care is necessary. Longer hairs should be plucked to maintain the proper texture and color.
The Dandie's head is large with a full domed skull. The eyes are large and deep hazel in color. They are set low and prominent in front of the head. The jaw is strong with a level bite. The ears are set back and low on the skull and hang down close to the cheek for approximately three or four inches. They are fringed at the tips. The chest is deep and powerful. The body should be two inches shorter in length than twice the height is long. The front legs are short with paws slightly curved outward for digging into the burrows of his quarry. The hind legs are longer and not as heavy as the forelegs. There is an arch over the loin and a slight drop to the root of the tail. The tail is from eight to ten inches in lenth and covered on the upper side with wiry hair and on the underside with long silky hair. The tail is set low, slightly curved and carried at about a 45-degree angle, like a scimitar. The coat is a double coat, which has a soft undercoat and a two-inch long outercoat that consists of both harsh and soft hairs. The head is covered in soft, silky hair that is longer on the top of the head forming a topknot. Coat colors include 1) pepper which may range from blue gray to light silver with tan or silver points or 2) mustard that ranges from dark ocher to cream with white points. The average weight is between eighteen and twenty-four pounds. Average height is from eight to eleven inches.


char224@yahoo.com of Modesto, CA writes:

Dandies are extremely affectionate.
We recently acquired a male Dandie Dinmont Terrier that is about one year old from the local pound. This Dandie has surpassed all of our expectations for a pet. We also have two cats and another Terrier/mix female dog. While our Dandie had a little trouble adjusting to the cats in the household, and Dandies are prone to this, we were fortunate because our older Terrier (twelve to thirteen years old) seemed to fully accept our little Dandie and "teach him the ropes" with behavior protocol with the cats. Our success is unusual, I understand, but I still feel than any Dandie can adjust to cats in the household with a firm, but gentle guidance, especially if they are young. Our Dandie is super lovable, and he tries to please us every way possible. He is super intelligent and learns very quickly. He has won our hearts from the first hour he was in our home. He is a wonderful pet in spite of the trauma of being a stray, and then being placed in the pound. Now he is a very happy dog with a family who loves him dearly.


katdude2000@hotmail.com of NW England writes on 3/3/00:

A friendly, sociable dog.
The Dandie is not only a beautiful dog, but it is also good natured and excellent with children.


| Breed Reviews By Breed | Review a Breed
Dandie Dinmont Terrier Home Page
Dogs Online