American Foxhounds


American Foxhounds

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Breed Notes

In the 1600s English, French and Irish Foxhounds were imported to the North American colonies and, when crossed, became the ancestors of the American Foxhound. The goal was a dog that could hunt fox and other animals in the woodlands of eastern America. The result was America's oldest sporting dog that is lighter boned and more houndy looking than the English Foxhound. They tend to prefer to hunt alone rather than in packs as do their English cousins. The American Foxhound also became the ancestor of many other hound breeds in the United States.
The American Foxhound can be trained to hunt any species of ground game. He has amazing endurance, exceptional speed, wonderful sense of smell and strong desire to reach his quarry. He is a lively, friendly, happy-go-lucky dog. Obedience training and firm handling is necessary. Due to their excessive energy, they do not make good housepets, particularly in the city.
The American Foxhound has a fairly long skull, slightly domed on top. The ears are set at eye level and are long enough, if pulled forward, to almost reach the tip of the nose. The eyes are large and set wide apart. They are hazel or brown in color. The muzzle is straight and square cut. The neck is strong and of medium length. The shoulders are muscular and the chest is deep. The back is moderately long, muscular and strong. The topline is flat. The legs are straight. The feet are fox-like with well-arched toes. The tail is set moderately high, tapering to a point with a fringe of hair on the underside. It is carried gaily. The coat is close, hard and of medium length. Any coat color is acceptable although tri-color appears to be the most popular. Average height is 21 to 25 inches. Average weight is between 65 and 75 pounds.


Name withheld by request of Berryville, AR writes:

Wrong statements concerning standard and notes on disposition.
The topline of a good American Foxhound as stated in the AKC standard calls for a slightly arched loin not a flat topline. This allows for speed, power and endurance. Good legs and feet are crucial.
Having bred hunting Foxhounds for over 30 years we have found this breed to be independent by nature but they usually get along with other dogs and are clowns at heart. Most have happy, sweet and steady dispositions, though they may be somewhat aloof of strangers until they have been properly introduced. They make great pets for families who have the time and energy to exercise them at least 30 minutes each day and they love children. This dog is not for the apartment dweller or someone with only a patio. Early socialization is a must.


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